These things I find.

CAUTION: I DON'T TAG MY PUNS

6,648 notes

blackrabbitsculpture:

Detail shots of my “Welcome to Inlé” sculpture, completed early July, 2014.

I realize I mentioned writing more about the piece when I posted these, but now I can’t for the life of me remember what it was I wanted to say.

Watership Down was one of the first novels I read as a child, probably at 10 or 12. I saw the animated film soon after, and it’s clear to me that both the book and the movie made an indelible impression on me. I reread the book every two or three years, and it hasn’t lost any of its power or impact. Most of all, I’m enthralled by the rich stories the rabbits share with one another throughout the novel. My love for mythology was certainly encouraged by reading WSD as a child.

Thanks for the wonderful response to this piece so far, you amazing folks!

Materials and dimensions and all that other good stuff can be found on the turnaround photoset that’s posted on my Tumblr, right below this post.

(via thethreehares)

258,953 notes

aconnormanning:

maneth985:

fallen-angel-with-a-shotgun:

dajo42:

if you dont have me on facebook you are probably not missing out on any posts but the comment section is important too lmao

I went to the Renaissance faire dressed as a warrior.  I had a real sword with me, too.  I was standing (in character) next to a sword-fighting ring, where kids of all ages got the chance to pick up a sword and challenge the champion.  Some woman walks by, with her little girl.  The girl starts walking towards the ring, saying she wants to fight.  But the mom pulled her away hella sharply, and was like, “That’s for boys.”  You don’t want to be a BOY, do you?”    And the girl looked around and saw me.  I think she thought I was a boy; I had my hair in a ponytail, and was wearing a hood.  So she comes up to me and asks me, “Do you think girls can be fighters, too?”  And her mom looks like she’s silently gloating.  Like she thinks I’m going to say no.  So I take off my hood, untie my hair so that it flows freely, and kneel before her.  And I’m like, “Milady, anyone can be a fighter.”  I swear, the look on that mother’s face made my day.



This post was good but then it got better

aconnormanning:

maneth985:

fallen-angel-with-a-shotgun:

dajo42:

if you dont have me on facebook you are probably not missing out on any posts but the comment section is important too lmao

I went to the Renaissance faire dressed as a warrior.  I had a real sword with me, too.  I was standing (in character) next to a sword-fighting ring, where kids of all ages got the chance to pick up a sword and challenge the champion.  Some woman walks by, with her little girl.  The girl starts walking towards the ring, saying she wants to fight.  But the mom pulled her away hella sharply, and was like, “That’s for boys.”  You don’t want to be a BOY, do you?”    And the girl looked around and saw me.  I think she thought I was a boy; I had my hair in a ponytail, and was wearing a hood.  So she comes up to me and asks me, “Do you think girls can be fighters, too?”  And her mom looks like she’s silently gloating.  Like she thinks I’m going to say no.  So I take off my hood, untie my hair so that it flows freely, and kneel before her.  And I’m like, “Milady, anyone can be a fighter.”  I swear, the look on that mother’s face made my day.

This post was good but then it got better

(via thelonelywyrm)

875 notes

hafanforever:

A Mother’s Concern for Another

Have any of you ever taken a moment to notice how much is going on even in this brief scene?

This is just after Elsa accidentally reveals her magic to the people in the ballroom. She runs all the way outside, where the waiting people of Arendelle clap and cheer because they are happy to see her. However, through all of the cheering, Elsa remains scared and just keeps running…and then she comes upon this woman who asks her if she is all right.

What really gets my attention here is that the citizens are so busy wrapped up in cheering for their queen that they don’t notice how unhappy she looks. But then she stumbles upon this lady, and while the lady is happy like everyone else, she is the only one who senses that something is amiss with Elsa.

Not to mention the lady is a mother, so it is likely her motherly instinct sets in and she can’t help but show concern for Elsa.

And look carefully at Elsa: after being asked if she is all right, she honestly answers because she shakes her head slightly and even quietly answers “No.”

What is heartbreaking in this moment is not that Elsa is scared, but what is really going on with her when she reacts to the question. Since she sees that this woman is a mother, it gets to her because she misses her own mother (and father). In this short, quick scene, Elsa is briefly reduced to a child again and feels that, based on this new turn of events, she still needs a parent’s care and guidance to help her get through it.

But even after she runs away and believes everyone is against her, there still is one person she can count on: Anna.

(via murdock-medigo)

29,406 notes

daddyzebra:

l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.
She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.
"No… They don’t, actually."
"And how do you communicate, then?"
"Talking?"
"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"
"It is, sometimes."
"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.
But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”
It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.
i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.
little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

I am HoH and was learning ASL as a toddler. I don’t remember much because I surprised my parents and audiologists by my rapid improvement to my speech. So we as a family didn’t need to use ASL as I got older. 
However, being 28 now, my family still forget that I am HoH. Sometimes they talk to me while walking away, talk too fast, or didn’t check to see if they have my undivided attention before telling me something important. But they always catch themselves and realize their mistakes.
The point is, even people who are willing to relearn everything can still slip up. What separates people who cares and who doesn’t is if they realize that they made a mistake and will take responsibility.
In short, I love my family, flaws and all. And they love me. 

daddyzebra:

l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.

She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.

"No… They don’t, actually."

"And how do you communicate, then?"

"Talking?"

"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"

"It is, sometimes."

"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.

But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”

It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.

i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.

little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

I am HoH and was learning ASL as a toddler. I don’t remember much because I surprised my parents and audiologists by my rapid improvement to my speech. So we as a family didn’t need to use ASL as I got older. 

However, being 28 now, my family still forget that I am HoH. Sometimes they talk to me while walking away, talk too fast, or didn’t check to see if they have my undivided attention before telling me something important. But they always catch themselves and realize their mistakes.

The point is, even people who are willing to relearn everything can still slip up. What separates people who cares and who doesn’t is if they realize that they made a mistake and will take responsibility.

In short, I love my family, flaws and all. And they love me.